Leaving Texas

Pioneers Fly to Paraguay

Pioneers Fly to Paraguay
1963, December 05

Big Spring Daily Herald 12-5-1963

Big Spring Daily Herald 12-5-1963-Fly to Paraguay

BROWNSVILLE. Tex. (AP) – A group of 76 American men, women and children – most of them former Baptists – left Brownsville this
morning to live in the back country of Paraguay. The heavily laden chartered Paraguayan airliner lifted off at 7 a.m., two hours behind schedule.
The group expects to reach Asuncion Paraguay, before noon tomorrow after stops in Panama City, Lima, Peru and Santiago, Chile.

The Rev. James A. St. John, 41, an ordained Baptist minister, former missionary, and one time Bloomington, Tex. Rancher, is the leader of the
group. St. John and the other men are always referred to among the 76 as brother, and the women are called sister.

DRUG ADDICT

Rev. Jack Wood, 35, is the second in command. Wood claims to be a reformed drug addict who became a Christian in Long Beach, Calif. He later was pastor of the Birdsall Baptist Church in Houston.

“We’re just going because the Lord spoke to our hearts,” Wood explains. “I think many of the men here have just pastured churches where people
didn’t want to hear except at a convenient time until they’ve just gotten sick of it. “They want to go now and teach the Gospel. We can also live the Gospel for them (natives) to see and teach the Scriptures. There is no education among the natives where we are going.”

FARM HANDS

The group includes three bulldozer operators, a ship’s captain, an airplane pilot, and an Indian who was a paratrooper. The remainder of the men are
cowboys or former farm hands.

For the past two weeks, the group has anxiously awaited a chartered airliner to take them to Ascuncion, the only city in Paraguay, with a large airport. From there, they will use boats and light airplanes to move 400 miles into the jungle.

A series of repairs and adjustments kept the airliner in Miami, Fla., until Tuesday when it flew into Brownsville. A fuel pump malfunction then grounded the plane here until a new pump could be flown in.

Log cabins, a church and a rough school have been erected on a 250,000 acre ranch owned by Pan-Western Enterprises, Inc., which is supplying the land for the group to live on.

MILE WIDE

The settlement is on the Paraguay River at a point where the huge stream is a mile wide and 60 feet deep. The area is just south of the Brazilian border and near the eastern border of Bolivia.

Plans for the massive undertaking were formulated more than a year ago at a missionary training and boys camp in Coalmont, Tenn., which St. John operated. The camp’s 1,000 acre ranch and 100 cattle were sold to help finance the expedition.

Since last June the pioneers have lived on a six-acre farm west of Harlingen, about 25 miles west of Brownsville.

Jim McRoberts of New Orleans, president of Pan-Western, says the settlement men will work on the huge ranch his firm owns, helping with the cattle.

The ex-paratrooper is Larry Murray, a member of the Otoe Indian tribe. Murray, from Ponca City, Okla., is taking along his two children, Franklin, 3, and Jacqueline, 4. He and his wife are divorced. He will work as a wrangler.

ONLY INDIANS

“We’re the only Indians going down.” Murray said, “but I understand there’ll be some other Indians (Paraguayan natives) down there.”

The group has spent almost $30,000 shipping 400 tons of equipment. The load included six tractors, three power plants, farm equipment, sawmill, road maintainers, a 70 foot boat, a 20 footer, four bulldozers, three printing presses, food, clothing and other personal belongings.

“We’re taking 30 different kinds of seeds with us, like celery, beans, watermelons, and stuff, so we can live,” Woods [sic] said.

 In the last article, reporting the Pilgrims receipt of “concessions,” evidently meant “payment,” in the form of “six tractors, three power plants, farm equipment, sawmill, road maintainers, a 70 foot boat, a 20 footer, four bulldozers, three printing presses.

76 Men, Women and Children Leave Today To Settle In Jungle
1963, December 05
Del Rio Texas –

76 Men & omen leave for South AmericaDel Rio Header

 A group of 76 American men, women and children – most of them former Baptists – left Brownsville this morning to live in the back country of Paraguay.
A group of 76 American men, women and children – most of them former Baptists – left Brownsville this morning to live in the back country of Paraguay.

BROWNSVILLE. Tex. (AP) – A group of 76 American men, women and children – most of them former Baptists – left Brownsville this morning to live in the back country of Paraguay.

The heavily laden chartered Paraguayan airliner lifted off at 7 a.m., two hours behind schedule.

The group expects to reach Asuncion Paraguay, before noon tomorrow after stops in Panama City, Lima, Peru and Santiago, Chile.

The Rev. James A. St. John, 41, an ordained Baptist minister, former missionary, and one time Bloomington, Tex. Rancher, is the leader of the group. St. John and the other men are always referred to among the 76 as brother, and the women are called sister.

Rev. Jack Wood, 35, is the second in command. Wood claims to be a reformed drug addict who became a Christian in Long Beach, Calif. He later was pastor of the Birdsall Baptist Church in Houston.

“We’re just going because the Lord spoke to our hearts,” Wood explains. “I think many of the men here have just pastored churches where people didn’t want to hear except at a convenient time until they’ve just gotten sick of it.

“They want to go now and teach the Gospel. We can also live the Gospel for them (natives) to see and teach the Scriptures. There is no education among the natives where we are going.”

The group includes three bulldozer operators, a ship’s captain, an airplane pilot, and an Indian who was a paratrooper. The remainders of the men are cowboys or former farm hands.

For the past two weeks, the group has anxiously awaited a chartered airliner to take them to Ascuncion, the only city in Paraguay, with a large airport. From there, they will use boats and light airplanes to move 400 miles into the jungle.

A series of repairs and adjustments kept the airliner in Miami, Fla., until Tuesday when it flew into Brownsville. A fuel pump malfunction then grounded the plane here until a new pump could be flown in.

Log cabins, a church and a rough school have been erected on a 250,000 acre ranch owned by Pan-Western Enterprises, Inc., which is supplying the land for the group to live on.

The settlement is on the Paraguay River at a point where the huge stream is a mile wide and 60 feet deep. The area is just south of the Brazilian border and near the eastern border of Bolivia.

Plans for the massive undertaking were formulated more than a year ago at a missionary training and boys camp in Coalmont, Tenn., which St. John operated. The camp’s 1,000 acre ranch and 100 cattle were sold to help finance the expedition.

Since last June the pioneers have lived on a six-acre farm west of Harlingen, about 35 miles west of Brownsville.

Jim McRoberts of New Orleans, president of Pan-Western, says the settlement men will work on the huge ranch his firm owns, helping with the cattle.

The ex-paratrooper is Larry Murray, a member of the Otoe Indian tribe. Murray, from Ponca City, Okla., is taking along his two children, Franklin, 3, and Jacqueline, 4. He and his wife are divorced. He will work as a wrangler.

“We’re the only Indians going down.” Murray said, “but I understand there’ll be some other Indians (Paraguayan natives) down there.”

The group has spent almost $30,000 shipping 400 tons of equipment. The load included six tractors, three power plants, farm equipment, sawmill, road maintainers, a 70 foot boat, a 20 footer, four bulldozers, three printing presses, food, clothing and other personal belongings.

“We’re taking 30 different kinds of seeds with us, like celery, beans, watermelons, and stuff, so we can live,” Woods said.

The pioneers, mostly from Texas, live simple lives. The women and older girls wear long dresses and no makeup, and the men and boys wear khakis and work clothes.

No smoking or drinking is permitted among the group, and most refrain from using coffee and tea.

*** End ***

Mom often joked that the plane broke down so many times, the mechanic fixed the plane with a coat hanger. She said flying in puddle jumpers was the scariest part of the trip, thus far.

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