Category Archives: 1965

Texas Minister Jailed in Paraguay

1965, February 17

Image2 02121965_Rustling

A Baptist minister from family to paraguay - CopyTexas began his fourth week in jail today, awaiting trial on charges of cattle rustling.

Police said the Rev. Jack Wood will stay in the jailhouse until his trial date at a date to be set later. His Texas home was not listed.
The Rev. Mr. Wood who heads a religious agricultural community 300 miles north of here, was arrested Jan 20, on the complaint of a neighboring rancher. The rancher said the Rev. Mr. Wood was responsible for the disappearance of several head of his cattle.

*** END ***

Life would never be the same. Things happen in life that change the course of direction, regardless what we may desire. The group of primarily social rejects became some of the meanest, most cruel people imaginable. Mom had no idea she was leaving her children with monsters but they were real monsters.

Pilgrims from Texas Get Into Trouble in Peurto Guarani South America

Pilgrims from Texas Get Into Trouble

1965, February 08

pilgrims get in trouble

San Antonio Light

HOUSTON – (AP) – The golden dream of a group of spiritual pilgrims who left Texas for a “paradise” in the bush country of Paraguay apparently has become somewhat tarnished.

One of the Paraguay pilgrims is in jail and five others were accused of illegally killing cattle.

The Houston Post published a story today of how the pilgrims are faring after having left Texas in December of 1963.

76 AT START

At the start there were 76 of them – many from Houston – but now only 48 remain in Paraguay. The rest, weary and disillusioned, had already given up and gone home.

The result may cause the ill-starred expedition to come to an end, the Post reported.

The Post learned that last month most of the pilgrims remaining in Paraguay took arms against the village of Puerto Guarani and stayed barricaded in a building for five days.

After the conflict ended – without bloodshed – six Americans faced charges of illegally killing cattle.

All were released but the Rev. Jack Wood  Jr. of Houston, who was in a federal prison in Asuncion. He was charged with killing cattle and resisting arrest.

RANCH LAND

McRoberts said the pilgrims, led by James A. St. John, a former Baptist pastor from Bloomington, Tex., have been living in Puerto Guarani, a settlement on the Paraguay River.

McRoberts helped the clan move there shortly after they arrived in Paraguay because the town had electricity and other conveniences.

“DONE NOTHING”

He said that since then the pilgrims have done “virtually nothing” to help themselves.

McRoberts said police there had been getting reports of domestic cattle were being killed or rustled.

Permission by Pan-Western had been given the pilgrims to kill wild, unbranded cattle, he said, but not domestic animals.

The five men jailed and later released were identified by McRoberts as William Smith and Eugene Couch, both of Houston, and Robert Watts of Abilene, Dwight Townsend and his brother, Calvin.

The townspeople of Puerto Guarani have asked the Americans be made to leave Paraguay.

**END**

“The Post learned that last month most of the pilgrims remaining in Paraguay took arms against the village of Puerto Guarani and stayed barricaded in a building for five days.

After the conflict ended – without bloodshed – six Americans faced charges of illegally killing cattle.”

Too bad no one questioned McRoberts’ refusal to pay for services rendered! I may not remember a lot of what went on, my father did not know how to Do Nothing! I’ll never forget McRoberts; he was a “big deal” to the people of Beulah Land. One day I was walking with my mother and sister when a man on a horse approached. He asked mom if I could ride with him and he leaned down to grab my arm so I could swing up behind his saddle. In the midst of swinging me up, I touched the saddle with my foot and he dropped me to the ground, laughing as if he gained pleasure from hurting a little girl.

Jack Wood, William (Will) Smith, Eugene Couch, Robert Watts, Dwight Townsend, and Calvin Townsend were imprisoned after a stand-off with the policia/vigilante because where we lived, dad was concerned that the authorities were so corrupt, the men would likely be hanged if taken into custody. Dad refused to allow the locals to arrest anyone and an armed stand off ensued.  I have letters and contracts somewhere around here that explain more of what was really going on. McRoberts is the contractor with Pan Western Cattle Company.

Missionary work had nothing to do with our existence in South America. A contract with Pan Western involved the men of Beulah Land finding wild cattle and driving them across the Parana River, into Argentina or Ascuncion. Why would McRoberts, the contractor, care if the cowboys ate a cow while driving cattle for weeks on end?

The Guaranians cared about us and Mr. Jiminez made certain the women and children were safe when the men were in prison. Our homes were raided while the men were gone. James St. John wasn’t arrested because he was in a neighboring village. The building in the background of where my eldest brother sits on the grass, with Johnnie standing, and a horse eating nearby, may have been the building where we held up. The men busted holes in the inside walls so that we could pass from room to room of the abandoned “hotel” without going outside. The men were outside and I never wanted to know that kind of terror. The kids were in the midst of a war zone and we knew we were in danger.

Rustling’ Charge Said Not Legal

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The Brownsville Herald
1965, February 17
ASUNCION, Paraguay (UPI)
-An attorney for a Baptist minister from Texas, imprisoned on cattle rustling charges, said today his client may soon be freed. Julio C. Cantero said the complaint filed against Jack Wood, 36, of Houston, lacks proper legal basis.”

Cantero said “Wood is accused specifically of “being the moral author of the slaughter of a three-year-old steer.”

In the worst of cases,” Cantero added, “this would be simply a case of ‘intentional damage” rustling is an unbailable offense whereas ‘intentional damage” is a much lesser crime.”

Wood, who heads a religious agricultural community 450 miles north of here, was arrested four weeks ago. He was accused of killing a steer owned by a neighboring rancher.

The manager of the Duggers Holmes Ranch, Angel de Aldecoa, filed the complaint against Wood.

Wood’s group left the United States in December, 1963, in protest against high taxes.

They settled in Paraguay under a contract with Pan Western Enterprises, the American company which owns the land they settled. Aldecoa is a vice president of Pan Western.

Wood’s wife and five children are in Asuncion awaiting his release Cantero said.